Grandmillennial style guide

by Lee Joseph 05/25/2022

Sometimes called “granny chic,” the grandmillennial style of decorating has come to the forefront of accessible design trends. Grandmillennial style is a perfect balance of new and vintage, mixing beloved heirloom pieces with contemporary essentials.

To help you understand the basics of this chic yet comfortable decorating scheme, here are some of the key elements of the style:

Vintage & modern

An emphasis on vintage furnishings and decor is where the “grand” in grandmillennial comes from. Whether timeworn or in perfect condition, vintage aesthetics are essential to achieving this design style.

However, to create balance and practicality, include more modern and contemporary furnishings as a starting point in your grandmillennial style space.

For example, major furniture pieces like sofas and beds are sleek and modern, while accessories and accents add vintage charm. Brown wood furniture is prominent in grandmillennial style interiors, both in contemporary and traditional style.

Blue, white & brass

While it’s difficult to define a specific color scheme in grandmillennial style design, one of the most popular combinations is white, blue and metallic brass. Blue and white often appear in traditional style fabrics, accessories and wallpaper. Victorian-era toile, decorated china and other precious heirloom accents add color and charm.

Shiny metallic brass is another common theme among decorative accessories, but also in furniture. For example, shelving units, table lamps and bathroom fixtures are perfect places for a brassy sparkle to complement the blue and white grandmillennial color scheme.

Patterns, prints & embellishments

Grandmillennial style incorporates traditional details into nearly every aspect of an interior space. Floral motifs, plaid, needlepoint and toile print are abundant and often blended to create layers of texture. Even grandmillennial spaces with sparse use of color feature classic styles in shades of white or other neutrals.

For a truly grandmillennial interior space, include plenty of floral prints, embroidered linens, pleated lampshades, fringed knit blankets and prominently displayed collections. While it’s best to avoid an overly cluttered aesthetic, don’t leave any surface without a decorative accessory.

While it might seem like a bold trend, grandmillennial style was born naturally through modern lifestyles. Opting to keep treasured heirlooms and furnishings in a classic style to combine with newer necessities can help you create an eclectic yet well edited design.

If you’re interested in something cozy, charming and timeless, try incorporating grandmillennial style into your home using these basic tips.

About the Author
Author

Lee Joseph

  

This is my 37th year in real estate and I love what I do! I enjoy making the American Dream of home ownership a reality. I believe in always being on the cutting edge of anything new in my industry and as a result, hold the national designations of ABR (Accredited Buyer Rep), CRS (Certified Residential Specialist), and SRES (Senior Residential Specialist). I received the Natalie Quinlan Distinguished Service Award in 2017, Realtor of the Year Award in 2013 and the Realtors Choice Award in 2010. I currently hold the Coldwell Banker President's Elite Award and the Central Massachusetts Association of Realtors Diamond Level Award. I believe in giving back to our industry and serve on many committees for RACM including Professional Standards (which I have also Chaired), Nominating Committee and Strategic Planning. I am currently President Elect and a member of the Executive Team. In the community, I am on the Board of Directors for Boys and Girls Club and Chair of Board Development Committee. I also enjoy supporting the performing arts and especially the Hanover Theatre. As Founding Members, my husband and I sat on various committees and enjoy attending as many performances as we can. I am a Shrewsbury resident and have raised two daughters who have enjoyed and benefited from an education from the Shrewsbury Public School system. I practice seller and buyer representation, new construction, and relocation.

Lee Joseph, ABR, CRS & SRES